Alerts

Updating Fertilizer Rules Public Comment

The Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food has posted updated fertilizer rules, Chapter 1100, for public comment. The Division of Regulatory Services will hold a public hearing on the proposed rules on July 15 at 10:00 am at the State House Annex building, Room 201, 25 Capitol Street, Concord, NH. The period for public comment ends Friday July 26. In general, the rules have expired and the department is adopting the most recent model bill as found in the 2013 AAPFCO Offical Publication. Please feel free to contact Jennifer Gornnert if you have any questions.

Dangerous Plant Alert

The plant is the giant hogweed (Heracleum mantegazzianum), originally from central Asia. Since its discovery it has spread all over the world, because as a specimen plant it is a knockout. White flowers nearly 3 feet in diameter bloom on top of stalks that can reach 15 feet tall. The tropical looking compound leaves grow 3-5 feet across and up to 9 feet long on purple spotted stalks. People naturally want to touch it because it is so unusual, and that is what makes this plant is so dangerous. More

NH Pesticide Licensing Changes

August 2011: The New Hampshire Division of Pesticide Control has recently made some changes in commercial pesticide licensing. A new law has passed that will allow people to get a Supervisory Registration Certificate in categories B-Right of Way and G2-Turf Pest Control. With this license, applicators will be able to apply general use pesticides. In order to obtain these licenses applicants must attend training seminars.

Training will be 8 contact hours of general instruction and 8 contact hours for each category. In addition to the contact hours applicants must pass a written and oral exam. In order to set up seminars we need to know how many people are interested in attending. We hope to get seminars started in December. If you are interested please email Lisa Mitrano at Lisa@SalmonFallsNursery.com.

 

NH Pesticide Applicators

The regulation of pesticides by states is built upon language in the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA.) One part of FIFRA known as Section 2(ee) exemptions allow:

  1. Use at any dosage, concentration, or frequency less than specified on the labeling.
  2. Use against any target pest not specified on the labeling.
  3. Methods of application not prohibited on the labeling.
  4. Mixtures with fertilizer unless prohibited on the labeling.

New Hampshire's Pesticide Control Board's Rules do not recognize FIFRA Section 2(ee) exemptions and instead require strict label compliance making NH one of the more restrictive states in regard to legal pesticide applications. In NH, any one of the four items listed in the prior paragraph render a pesticide application illegal.

A proposal containing potential changes to the Pesticide Control Board's Rules has been filed with the Division of Administrative Rules. This is an early step of the rule making process that should be completed in early 2010. A major focus of these changes is to facilitate pesticide applications, and allow for rapid response scenarios, in the control and management of invasive species. In addition to updating special permitting and notification requirements for treatments within rights-of-ways, the proposed rule changes remove the requirement of strict label compliance for pests on the New Hampshire prohibited invasive species list.

 

The regulation of pesticides by states is built upon language in the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA.) One part of FIFRA known as Section 2(ee) exemptions allow:

  1. Use at any dosage, concentration, or frequency less than specified on the labeling.
  2. Use against any target pest not specified on the labeling.
  3. Methods of application not prohibited on the labeling.
  4. Mixtures with fertilizer unless prohibited on the labeling.

New Hampshire's Pesticide Control Board's Rules do not recognize FIFRA Section 2(ee) exemptions and instead require strict label compliance making NH one of the more restrictive states in regard to legal pesticide applications. In NH, any one of the four items listed in the prior paragraph render a pesticide application illegal.

A proposal containing potential changes to the Pesticide Control Board's Rules has been filed with the Division of Administrative Rules. This is an early step of the rule making process that should be completed in early 2010. A major focus of these changes is to facilitate pesticide applications, and allow for rapid response scenarios, in the control and management of invasive species. In addition to updating special permitting and notification requirements for treatments within rights-of-ways, the proposed rule changes remove the requirement of strict label compliance for pests on the New Hampshire prohibited invasive species list.

 

The regulation of pesticides by states is built upon language in the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA.) One part of FIFRA known as Section 2(ee) exemptions allow:

  1. Use at any dosage, concentration, or frequency less than specified on the labeling.
  2. Use against any target pest not specified on the labeling.
  3. Methods of application not prohibited on the labeling.
  4. Mixtures with fertilizer unless prohibited on the labeling.

New Hampshire's Pesticide Control Board's Rules do not recognize FIFRA Section 2(ee) exemptions and instead require strict label compliance making NH one of the more restrictive states in regard to legal pesticide applications. In NH, any one of the four items listed in the prior paragraph render a pesticide application illegal.

A proposal containing potential changes to the Pesticide Control Board's Rules has been filed with the Division of Administrative Rules. This is an early step of the rule making process that should be completed in early 2010. A major focus of these changes is to facilitate pesticide applications, and allow for rapid response scenarios, in the control and management of invasive species. In addition to updating special permitting and notification requirements for treatments within rights-of-ways, the proposed rule changes remove the requirement of strict label compliance for pests on the New Hampshire prohibited invasive species list.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Below please find important information for identifying, preventing Woolly Adelgid and any quarantines currently in place.

USDA Forest Service Bulletin
USDA's Woolly Adelgid Quarantine for the State of New Hampshire
Hemlock In-state Quarantine - Rockingham County, New Hampshire - effective January 2003
Frequently Asked Questions - Hemlock Woolly Adelgid - disributed by the New Hampshire Division of Forests and Lands
Brooklyn Botanical Garden's Information on Woolly Adelgid

Asian Long Horned Beetle

The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) has been found in Massachusetts. This insect pest poses a serious risk to New Hampshire forests. Although it has not been found anywhere in New Hampshire, it was discovered in Worcester, MA in early August 2008.

Want to learn more about the Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) threat? UNH Cooperative Extension's web site keeps interested citizens up-to-date on local and regional efforts to locate ALB and prevent it from devastating our forests. Visit www.extension.unh.edu/ALB for more information.